[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text]Marcus Rashford’s recent campaign to stop ‘holiday hunger’ brought out the best in many communities across England – including Bedford. Over a million people signed a petition asking the government to support Rashford’s request. Restaurants and cafes across England delivered packed lunches for children in vulnerable families. In a time of polarised politics – this was a cause the majority wanted to support. Three weeks later, the government acceded to the footballer’s request. £170 million has been made available to support vulnerable children through the extension of school activities and meals throughout the holidays up to Christmas 2021.

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column][vc_column_text]“The most satisfying jobs are those that involve caring for and protecting people. The happiest jobs are those that involve giving to others.” We all know people who've ‘fallen out of love’ with their job in their 40s. Maybe the career that was once exciting now fails to satisfy. Perhaps a good wage is no longer enough to justify the daily grind. For many there’s a feeling that time is running out, if they’re to retrain, refocus and refresh their passion for work. Lots of care workers come into the Social Care profession in later life. They all have their stories to tell, but there’s generally a common theme running through them: “Earning a living wasn't enough for me any more; I wanted to make a difference.” “At a certain point you reassess what you’re spending your life doing. I wanted to do something meaningful” “I’d always wanted to be part of a caring profession but I hadn’t had the confidence. Once I hit 40 it was now or never.”